Samuel Cortès

Samuel Cortès

Born in 1992, in France.

Lives in France. Travels in Madagascar.

Interested in the art of photography which he discovered from his father, Samuel Cortès began the practice of photography in 2010.

During the following three years, he has been travelling Slovenia, Hungry, and the Czech Republic. In France, he made a report on educative Boxing for the youth of the suburbs. > Lire la suite

In 2012, he contributed to the development of an association project, with his series of photography of the discriminated people of Geneva, in Switzerland.

In 2013, freshly qualified in joinery, he set out for Madagascar. On the Island, he lives in close relationship with Malagasy people, learning their language and their customs and manners. He then discovered not only the wealth of these people, but also the various troubles they have to face.

Through a journalistic and artistic lenses, he describes a Baobab-less and lemurian-less Madagascar, ignoring the marvels for tourists.

The light he sheds on Madagascar offers a denouncing look full of despair. Through encounters and sharing, though, glimmers some subtle ray of hope. It is as if photography is, for him, a form of relationship. He wants to reveal the hardships faced by the people who received him, tough but glimmering at times.

Paradoxes Enfantins - Children’s Paradoxes

  • Dates Du 17 octobre au 07 novembre 2013

“Children do have a specific quality which interests me. It is that capacity of finding themselves at home wherever they are, that talent of living their own liberty, their plays and their dreams. These children were in their home, in the streets. I was attracted by the contrast they unconsciously trace: the contrast of their clothes with the surrounding setting.”

From Antananarivo to Tuléar, and from Fianarantsoa to Antsirabe, Paradoxes Enfantins – Children’s Paradoxes has been an 8-months working-out of encounters made in Madagascar. > Lire la suite

This is just a part of all these encounters which made me discover, all the way through, this unacceptable aspect of some childhood.

The living conditions of these children are horrible. But while the presented faces of the pictures express sadness, they nonetheless manifested a smile, timid at times and intimate when we depart from one another.

By cutting the eyes of the children from the exhibited pictures, I erased the “star” of the photograph, i.e. the look.

I wanted to focus on the clothes and the expression. The clothes tell what they want to, and the downward part of the face questions the reading of the picture and the viewer’s imagination.

If I had had not pull out the look, it would have been too much important. Here, it is not useful.

(NB: However, for those interested in the look, please contact the person in charge at Is’Art Gallery.)

 

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